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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the sheriff. >> just broken. >> washington was -- washington barely ran for a second term because he was so tired of being criticized. adams was defeated. jefferson left under a huge cloud. truman is the modern example of every president who gets in trouble wants to be truman because it means history implicates you, right? one of the things that happened was watergate. and it took 30 years, maybe a little bit less, but truman -- remember that one-man show -- >> the merle miller one? >> the plain speaking -- but there was a one-man show that went on just as watergate was breaking. and truman had the great good fortune of having disliked richard nixon early and had a lot of quotations about it. and he suddenly, as faith in the public sector is falling in the early '70s, all the examples you're talking about with truman are looking better and better. a president who, as evan wrote about the wise men, he was the popular embodiment of an american willingness to project power and to stand guard over a really complicated dark world. >> by the way, during the mid'70s, also, even chicago, the band c
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
the can down the road doesn't make anybody younger or wiser in washington, but often keeps them elected. thanks for watching "state of the union" i'm candy crowley in washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." stay with cnn for continuing coverage of the fiscal cliff negotiations. fareed zakaria "gps" is next. >>> the great french writer albert camel said life is a sum of all your choices. we're all defined by the choices we make every day, we make hundreds of them. paper or plastic, chicken or fish, most are mundane and require little thought, but others are agonizing, often life altering and then there are the decisions made by leaders. some of which have changed the course of history for better and some for worse. july 1776, the founding fathers decision to declare independence. january 1863, abraham lincoln's decision to emancipate all persons held as slaves. june 1941, adolf hitler's decision to invade the soviet union. august 1945, president truman's decision to use an atomic bomb against japan. tonight, we'll examine t
see already, there is a different tone in washington. i think elections matter. the voters spoke. even though the race was relatively close, it was not that close in the electoral college. even the margin has expanded now to 4 million votes. i think people read those results. i think, for example, on an issue like immigration reform, the prospects for passing comprehensive immigration reform in the near future -- near future are much greater than they were three weeks ago because of the result of the election. i think the chance of coming to an agreement on this fiscal cliff are greater today because of this election. politicians read election results. i do not know whether our campaign or their campaign fostered the environment for that. i think the voters did, and that is as it should be. >> the last couple questions -- we will come back to this side. >> my question is, in the days following the election there was a fair amount of coverage about the divisiveness of the obama for america ground game -- i was wondering, how you need you think that model was for this campaign and candid
and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you have a certain risk factor. was it really
letter to secretary clinton and left washington. she resumed her princeton professorship and life in new jersey with her husband and two teenage sons. in the wake of her departure, slaughter wrote a cover story for "the atlantic magazine" why women still can't have it all. within days, the piece became the most read in t"the atlantic's" history. tonight, she takes us behind that personal decision that became a raging public debate. explain the intensity of that kind of job, because it's really much more than what many people think. thisst is a more intense job th senior jobs in the private sector. >> it's certainly comparable. it's an assistant secretary job, which means you're on pretty much all the time. you're the head of the secretary of state's private think tank. that means you cover the entire world, just as she does. and you're on for everything she needs you to do. and every sort of -- the longer-term planning and you work pretty much round the clock. >> so you're working probably six days a week? >> absolutely. now, i commuted back every weekend because i had to be with my kids
to the relationships here in washington, it's a good thing that it's these two men that are working together and you're right, it does rest on their shoulders right now. >> dana bash, covering the stories for us on capitol hill. i have with me michael crowley, and a.b. stoddard and jessica yellen. >> it's great if the two can come to an agreement and the white house loves it, but it's always been the house that's been the sticking point. what do you think the scenario is there, a.b.? >> that's going to be tough for the house speaker. he said on friday in meeting with all the leaders and the president that he wanted to bring something up. might be amended and sent back to the senate. he doesn't know what's in there. how much money the democrats are going to push for to cover the medicare doc fix. the uninsurance -- excuse me, unemployment insurance that is going to lapse at the end of the year and put 2 million people out of reach of a check. and there's other issues. the alternative minimum tax. a lot of money that they're scrambling to find as they also deal with the tax issues. so it's really goin
was that our supporters would read this and it would spend -- especially in washington, the world's biggest record chamber -- people would get nervous and worried. when those things happen, you find everyone very generous with their advice. [laughter] the frustration was less than we be worried about where we were but other people's behavior and that it would create a disillusionment among supporters. so we spent a lot of the campaign fighting back against some of these polls. what was remarkable about this race, as looking of the data that we had, it was not how volatile it was, but how steady it was. from february through november, we were running in our own data generally a two-point to 4-point lead. we never fell behind. there was a time in september, after the conventions, we had a strong convention and they had not so strong convention, and came the famous 47% tape. we got a six-point or seven- point battleground states lead. some republican leaning voters moved away from romney. and then can the first debate, which we strategically planned a little suspense for. [laughter] >> there w
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
a dangerous game with investing in washington, in the congress. so my question to you is, if the united states congress, specifically the house of representatives, were a private industry, would you invest in it? would you buy it? >> i think i'd get new management. but i wouldn't give up on the country at all. it's a wonderful country. believe me, 535 people aren't going to screw it up forever for 512 million. >> but they can screw it up momentarily. >> they sure can. >> 1956, you write an article about this little-known -- >> one sentence. >> one sentence. >> it was in an article about another guy. >> this guy in omaha. at what point did the lightbulb go off over your head and said, okay, he's different, he's not only game changer, he's the guy that's going to create a new game? >> well, i may not have been that good, that expansive in my thinking, but i met him first in 1967. my husband had met him first and came homed and said, i think i may have met the smartest investor in the united states. and i think i probably rolled my eyes, because, you know, how husbands are always making these exa
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)